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Ayon Ganguly

Department of Statistics, University of Pune Co-authors

Prof. Debasis Kundu2and Dr. Sharmishtha Mitra2 January 01, 2014

1Part of this work has been supported by grants from DST and CSIR, Government of India.

2Department of Mathematics and Statistics, IIT Kanpur.

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1 Censoring

2 Step-stress Life Tests

3 A Brief Literature Review

4 Model Description and Prior Assumptions

5 Posterior Analysis

6 Data Analysis

7 Conclusion

8 Future Works

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Censoring

Quite useful technique in reliability life testing.

Possible termination of experiment before failing all the experimental units.

Lower cost in terms of money and time than full experiment.

Survival experimental units can be used for further experiments.

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n : Number of items put on the test.

τ : Pre-fixed time.

τ =τ : Experiment termination time.

n

0 τ

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Type-I Censoring

n : Number of items put on the test.

τ : Pre-fixed time.

τ =τ : Experiment termination time.

n

0 τ

τ

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n : Number of items put on the test.

τ : Pre-fixed time.

τ =τ : Experiment termination time.

n

0 τ

τ

t1:n

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Type-I Censoring

n : Number of items put on the test.

τ : Pre-fixed time.

τ =τ : Experiment termination time.

n

0 τ

τ

t1:n t2:n

(9)

n : Number of items put on the test.

τ : Pre-fixed time.

τ =τ : Experiment termination time.

n

0 τ

τ

t1:n t2:n · · · tN:n

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Type-I Censoring

n : Number of items put on the test.

τ : Pre-fixed time.

τ =τ : Experiment termination time.

n

0 τ

τ

t1:n t2:n · · · tN:n

Number of failures is a random variable.

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n : Number of items put on the test.

τ : Pre-fixed time.

τ =τ : Experiment termination time.

n

0 τ

τ

t1:n t2:n · · · tN:n

Number of failures is a random variable.

Advantage : Pre-fixed experiment termination time.

Disadvantage: Very few failures, even no failure, before time τ.

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Type-II Censoring

n : Number of items put on the test.

r(≤n): Pre-fixed integer.

τ =tr:n : Experiment termination time.

n

0

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n : Number of items put on the test.

r(≤n): Pre-fixed integer.

τ =tr:n : Experiment termination time.

n

0 t1:n

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Type-II Censoring

n : Number of items put on the test.

r(≤n): Pre-fixed integer.

τ =tr:n : Experiment termination time.

n

0 t1:n t2:n

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n : Number of items put on the test.

r(≤n): Pre-fixed integer.

τ =tr:n : Experiment termination time.

n

0 t1:n t2:n · · · tr:n

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Type-II Censoring

n : Number of items put on the test.

r(≤n): Pre-fixed integer.

τ =tr:n : Experiment termination time.

n

0 t1:n t2:n · · · tr:n

τ

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n : Number of items put on the test.

r(≤n): Pre-fixed integer.

τ =tr:n : Experiment termination time.

n

0 t1:n t2:n · · · tr:n

τ

Duration of experiment is a random variable.

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Type-II Censoring

n : Number of items put on the test.

r(≤n): Pre-fixed integer.

τ =tr:n : Experiment termination time.

n

0 t1:n t2:n · · · tr:n

τ

Duration of experiment is a random variable.

Advantage : Pre-fixed number of failures.

Disadvantage: Long experimental duration.

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Hybrid Censoring Schemes: Hybridization of Type-I and Type-II censoring.

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Other Censoring Schemes

Hybrid Censoring Schemes: Hybridization of Type-I and Type-II censoring.

Progressive Censoring Schemes: Allow to remove items from the test before completion of the experiment.

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Hybrid Censoring Schemes: Hybridization of Type-I and Type-II censoring.

Progressive Censoring Schemes: Allow to remove items from the test before completion of the experiment.

Progressive Hybrid Censoring Schemes: Mixture of hybrid and progressive censoring schemes.

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Other Censoring Schemes

Hybrid Censoring Schemes: Hybridization of Type-I and Type-II censoring.

Progressive Censoring Schemes: Allow to remove items from the test before completion of the experiment.

Progressive Hybrid Censoring Schemes: Mixture of hybrid and progressive censoring schemes.

All the censoring schemes suffer form the disadvantage of either Type-I or Type-II censoring scheme.

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Accelerated Life Tests

Useful experimental technique to obtain data on the lifetime distribution of highly reliable products.

Put a sample of products on the test in some extreme environmental conditions to get early failures.

Need to extrapolate to estimate the lifetime distribution under the normal condition.

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A particular type of accelerated life test.

Allows the experimenter to change the stress levels during the life-testing experiments.

n : Number of items put on the test.

s1,s2 : Stress levels (Simple SSLT).

τ : Stress changing time (Pre-fixed).

n

0 τ

s1 s2

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Step-stress Life Tests

A particular type of accelerated life test.

Allows the experimenter to change the stress levels during the life-testing experiments.

n : Number of items put on the test.

s1,s2 : Stress levels (Simple SSLT).

τ : Stress changing time (Pre-fixed).

n

0 τ

s1 s2

t1:n t2:n . . . tN:n tN+1:n . . . tn:n

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Generalization

n : No of items placed on the test.

s1,s2,s3, . . . ,sm+1 : Stress levels.

τ1 < τ2 < . . . < τm : Stress changing times (Pre-fixed).

n

0 τ1

s1

. . . τm−1

sm

τm

sm+1 t1:n. . . tN1:n tNm−1+1:n

. . .tNm:n tNm+1:n. . .tn:n

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Models

Consider a simple SSLT,i.e., only two stress levels, s1 and s2, present.

Fi(.) : CDF of lifetime of an item under the stress level si, i = 1, 2 . . . , m+ 1.

F(.) : CDF of life time of an item under the step-stress pattern.

Model needed to relate F(·) toFi(·), i = 1, 2, . . . , m+ 1.

Popular models

Cumulative exposure model.

Tampered failure rate model.

Khamis-Higgins model.

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First proposed by Seydyakin (1966)4 and later studied by Nelson(1980)5.

Fi(·) is the CDF of lifetime of an item under the stress level si, i = 1,2, . . . ,m+ 1.

F(·) is the CDF of lifetime of an item under the step-stress pattern.

4Seydyakin, N. M. (1966) On one physical principle in reliability theory,Technical Cybernatics, 3:80-87.

5Nelson (1980) Accelerated life testing: step-stress models and data analysis,IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 141:288-2838.

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Cumulative Exposure Model

The CEM assumptions are:

The remaining life of an item depends only on the current cumulative fraction accumulated, regardless how the fraction accumulated.

If the stress level is fixed, the survivors will fail according to the distribution function of that stress level but starting at previous accumulated fraction failed.

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F2(·)

F1(·)

h τ

F(·)

0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

0 10 20 30 40 50

(a) CDF under different stress level

0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1

0 10 20 30 40 50

(b) CDF under CEM

Figure: Example of CEM

HereF1(·) and F2(·) are CDF of Exp(14) andExp(1) respectively.

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Cumulative Exposure Model

Under the assumptions of CEM, the CDF of the lifetime is given by FCEM(t) =Fi(t −τi1+hi1) if τi1 ≤t < τi, i = 1, 2, . . . , m+ 1, where τ0 = 0, τm+1 =∞, h0 = 0 and hi,i = 1, 2, . . . , m, is the solution of

Fi+1(hi) =Fii −τi−1+hi−1).

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Proposed by Bhattacharyya and Soejoeti (1989) for simple SSLT.

Generalized by Madi (1993)2 for multiple step SSLT.

1Bhattacharyya, G. K. and Soejoeti, Z. (1989), A tampered failure rate model for step-stress accelerated life test,Communication in Statistics - Theory and Methods, 18:1627–1643.

2Madi, M. T. (1993), Multiple step-stress accelerated life test: the tampered failure rate model,Communication in Statistics - Theory and Methods, 22:2631–2639.

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Tampered Failure Rate Model

Proposed by Bhattacharyya and Soejoeti (1989)1 for simple SSLT.

Generalized by Madi (1993)2 for multiple step SSLT.

Effect of switching the stress level is to multiply the failure rate of the first stress level by a positive constant.

λTFRM(t) =

i1

Y

j=0

αj

!

λ(t) if τi1 ≤t < τi,i = 1,2, . . . , m+ 1.

1Bhattacharyya, G. K. and Soejoeti, Z. (1989), A tampered failure rate model for step-stress accelerated life test,Communication in Statistics - Theory and Methods, 18:1627–1643.

2Madi, M. T. (1993), Multiple step-stress accelerated life test: the tampered failure rate model,Communication in Statistics - Theory and Methods, 22:2631–2639.

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Proposed by Khamis and Higgins (1998)1 for Weibull lifetimes.

1Khamis, I. H. and Higgins, J. J. (1998), A new model for step-stress testing,IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 47:131–134.

2Xu, H. and Tang, Y. (2003), Commentary: The Khamis/Higgins model,IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 52:4–6.

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Khamis-Higgins Model

Proposed by Khamis and Higgins (1998)1 for Weibull lifetimes.

Under KHM, the CDF is given by

FKHM(t) =1−eλi(tβτiβ−1)Pij=1−1λjjβτj−1β ) if τi−1 ≤t < τi.

1Khamis, I. H. and Higgins, J. J. (1998), A new model for step-stress testing,IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 47:131–134.

2Xu, H. and Tang, Y. (2003), Commentary: The Khamis/Higgins model,IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 52:4–6.

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Proposed by Khamis and Higgins (1998)1 for Weibull lifetimes.

Under KHM, the CDF is given by

FKHM(t) =1−eλi(tβτiβ−1)Pij=1−1λjjβτj−1β ) if τi−1 ≤t < τi. Xu and Tang (2003)2 showed that KHM is a particular case of TFRM.

1Khamis, I. H. and Higgins, J. J. (1998), A new model for step-stress testing,IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 47:131–134.

2Xu, H. and Tang, Y. (2003), Commentary: The Khamis/Higgins model,IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 52:4–6.

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Advantages

By increasing the stress level, reasonable number of failure can be obtained.

Experimental time is reduced.

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Exact relationship between the stress level and lifetime of the product is needed.

Model must take into account the effect of stress accumulated.

Model becomes more complicated.

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Balakrishnan et al. (2007)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Type-II censoring.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

1Balakrishnan, N., Kundu, D., Ng, H. K. T., and Kannan, N. Point and interval estimation for a simple step-stress model with Type-II censoring. Journal of Quality Technology, 9:35–47, 2007.

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Literature Review

Balakrishnan et al. (2007)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Type-II censoring.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ Point and interval estimation are considered.

1Balakrishnan, N., Kundu, D., Ng, H. K. T., and Kannan, N. Point and interval estimation for a simple step-stress model with Type-II censoring. Journal of Quality Technology, 9:35–47, 2007.

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Balakrishnan et al. (2007)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Type-II censoring.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ Point and interval estimation are considered.

◮ fθb

1(t) =

r−1

X

j=1

Xj

k=0

cjkfG(t−τik;j, j θ1).

◮ cjk involves (−1)k, nj , kj

, ande

τ

θ1(nj+k)

.

◮ fG(·) is the PDF of Gamma distribution.

1Balakrishnan, N., Kundu, D., Ng, H. K. T., and Kannan, N. Point and interval estimation for a simple step-stress model with Type-II censoring. Journal of Quality Technology, 9:35–47, 2007.

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Literature Review

Balakrishnan et al. (2009)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Type-I censoring.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

1Balakrishnan, N., Xie, Q., and Kundu, D. Exact inference for a simple step-stress model from the exponential distribution under time constrain.Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 61:251–274, 2009.

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Balakrishnan et al. (2009)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Type-I censoring.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ Point and interval estimation are considered.

1Balakrishnan, N., Xie, Q., and Kundu, D. Exact inference for a simple step-stress model from the exponential distribution under time constrain.Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 61:251–274, 2009.

(46)

Literature Review

Balakrishnan et al. (2009)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Type-I censoring.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ Point and interval estimation are considered.

◮ fθb

1(t) =cn n−1

X

j=1

Xj

k=0

cjkfG(t−τik;j, j θ1).

◮ cjk involves (−1)k, nj , kj

, ande

τ

θ1(nj+k)

.

◮ fG(·) is the PDF of Gamma distribution.

1Balakrishnan, N., Xie, Q., and Kundu, D. Exact inference for a simple step-stress model from the exponential distribution under time constrain.Annals of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 61:251–274, 2009.

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Balakrishnan and Xie (2007)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Hybrid Type-II censored data.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

1Balakrishnan, N. and Xie, Q. Exact inference for a simple step-stress model with Type-II hybrid censored data from the exponential distribution constrain.Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference, 137:2543–2563, 2007.

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Literature Review

Balakrishnan and Xie (2007)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Hybrid Type-II censored data.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ Point and interval estimation are considered.

◮ Exact distributions of model parameters are obtained.

◮ These exact distributions are used to construct confidence intervals.

1Balakrishnan, N. and Xie, Q. Exact inference for a simple step-stress model with Type-II hybrid censored data from the exponential distribution constrain.Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference, 137:2543–2563, 2007.

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Balakrishnan and Xie (2007)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Hybrid Type-I censored data.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

1Balakrishnan, N. and Xie, Q. Exact inference for a simple step-stress model with Type-I hybrid censored data from the exponential distribution constrain.Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference, 137:3268–3290, 2007.

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Literature Review

Balakrishnan and Xie (2007)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Hybrid Type-I censored data.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ Point and interval estimation are considered.

◮ Exact distributions of model parameters are obtained.

◮ These exact distributions are used to construct confidence intervals.

1Balakrishnan, N. and Xie, Q. Exact inference for a simple step-stress model with Type-I hybrid censored data from the exponential distribution constrain.Journal of Statistical Planning and Inference, 137:3268–3290, 2007.

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Balakrishnan et al. (2009)1.

◮ Multi-step step-stress life test.

◮ Type-I and Type-II censored data.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ Order restriction among means of lifetimes.

1Balakrishnan, N., Beutner, E., and Kateri, M. Order Restricted Inference for Exponential Step-Stress Models. IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 58:132–142, 2009.

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Literature Review

Balakrishnan et al. (2009)1.

◮ Multi-step step-stress life test.

◮ Type-I and Type-II censored data.

◮ Exponentially distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ Order restriction among means of lifetimes.

◮ MLE does not exist in explicit form.

◮ Further analysis depends on asymptotic results.

1Balakrishnan, N., Beutner, E., and Kateri, M. Order Restricted Inference for Exponential Step-Stress Models. IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 58:132–142, 2009.

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Kateri and Balakrishnan (2008)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Type-II censoring.

◮ Weibull distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

1Kateri, M., and Balakrishnan, N. Inference for a simple step-stress model with type-II censoring, and Weibull distributed lifetimes. IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 57:616–626, 2008.

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Literature Review

Kateri and Balakrishnan (2008)1.

◮ Simple step-stress life test.

◮ Type-II censoring.

◮ Weibull distributed failure times.

◮ Cumulative exposure model.

◮ MLE does not exist in explicit form.

◮ Further analysis depends on asymptotic results.

1Kateri, M., and Balakrishnan, N. Inference for a simple step-stress model with type-II censoring, and Weibull distributed lifetimes. IEEE Transactions on Reliability, 57:616–626, 2008.

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Model Description

n : Number of item put on the test.

s1, s2 : Stress levels.

τ1 : Stress changing time (Pre-fixed).

Type-I censored data.

τ2(> τ1) : Censoring time (Pre-fixed).

n

s1 s2

0 τ1 τ2

t1:n . . . tn

1:n tn

1+1:n . . . tn:n

0 τ1 τ2

t1:n . . . tn1:n

0 τ1 τ2

t1:n . . . tn:n

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n : Number of item put on the test.

s1, s2 : Stress levels.

τ1 : Stress changing time (Pre-fixed).

Type-I censored data.

τ2(> τ1) : Censoring time (Pre-fixed).

Life time at stress level si,i = 1,2, has a Weibull(β, λi) distribution, i.e., its CDF is given by

Fi(t) =

( 1−e−λitβ if t >0

0 otherwise.

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Model Description

Under CEM, the CDF is given by

FCEM(t) =





0 ift <0

1−eλ1tβ if 0≤t < τ1

1−eλ2

tτ1+λλ1

2τ1β

ift ≥τ1.

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Under CEM, the CDF is given by

FCEM(t) =





0 ift <0

1−eλ1tβ if 0≤t < τ1

1−eλ2

tτ1+λλ1

2τ1β

ift ≥τ1.

Under KHM, the CDF is given by FKHM(t) =



0 ift <0

1−eλ1tβ if 0≤t < τ1 1−eλ2(tβτ1β)−λ1τ1β ifτ1 <t <∞.

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Model Description

Under CEM, the CDF is given by

FCEM(t) =





0 ift <0

1−eλ1tβ if 0≤t < τ1

1−eλ2

tτ1+λλ1

2τ1β

ift ≥τ1.

Under KHM, the CDF is given by FKHM(t) =



0 ift <0

1−eλ1tβ if 0≤t < τ1 1−eλ2(tβτ1β)−λ1τ1β ifτ1 <t <∞.

KHM is mathematically tractable than CEM.

It is difficult to distinguish between CEM and KHM.

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λ1 ∼ Gamma(a1, b1).

λ2 ∼ Gamma(a2, b2).

β ∼Gamma(a3, b3).

λ1, λ2, and β are independently distributed.

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Prior Assumptions II

Main aim of SSLT is to get rapid failure by imposing extreme environmental condition.

Plausible to assume that the mean life time at stress levels2 is smaller than that at stress level s1.

λ1 < λ2.

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Main aim of SSLT is to get rapid failure by imposing extreme environmental condition.

Plausible to assume that the mean life time at stress levels2 is smaller than that at stress level s1.

λ1 < λ2.

Reparameterize λ1 =αλ2 with 0< α <1.

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Prior Assumptions II

Main aim of SSLT is to get rapid failure by imposing extreme environmental condition.

Plausible to assume that the mean life time at stress levels2 is smaller than that at stress level s1.

λ1 < λ2.

Reparameterize λ1 =αλ2 with 0< α <1.

λ2 ∼ Gamma(a2, b2).

β ∼Gamma(a3, b3).

α∼ Beta(a4, b4).

α, β, and λ2 are independently distributed.

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Weibull distribution is quite flexible and fits a large range of lifetime data.

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Motivation

Weibull distribution is quite flexible and fits a large range of lifetime data.

MLEs of the model parameters do not have explicit form and all inferences rely on asymptotic distributions.

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Posterior Distribution under Prior Assumptions I

Forβ > 0,λ1 >0, and λ2 >0

l1(β, λ1, λ2|Data)∝βn+a31λn11+a1−1λn22+a2−1

×e(b3c1λ1A1(β)λ2A2(β),

n =n1+n2, c1 =

n

X

j=1

lntj:n,

A1(β) = b1+

n1

X

j=1

tjβ:n+ (n−n11β,

A2(β) = b2+

n

X

j=n1+1

(tjβ:n−τ1β) + (n−n)(τ2β −τ1β).

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l1(β, λ1, λ2|Data)∝βn+a31λn11+a1−1λn22+a2−1

×e(b3c1λ1A1(β)λ2A2(β),

n =n1+n2, c1 =

n

X

j=1

lntj:n,

A1(β) = b1+

n1

X

j=1

tjβ:n+ (n−n11β,

A2(β) = b2+

n

X

j=n1+1

(tjβ:n−τ1β) + (n−n)(τ2β −τ1β).

l1(β, λ1, λ2|Data) is integrable if proper priors are assumed on all the unknown parameters.

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Posterior Distribution under Prior Assumptions II

For 0< α < 1,β >0, andλ2 >0

l2(α, β, λ2|Data)∝αn1+a41(1−α)b41βn+a31λn2+a2−1

×e(b3c1λ2(αD1(β)+D2(β)+b2),

n =n1+n2, c1 =

n

X

j=1

lntj:n,

D1(β) =

n1

X

j=1

tj:nβ + (n−n11β,

D2(β) =

n

X

j=n1+1

(tjβ:n−τ1β) + (n−n)(τ2β −τ1β).

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l2(α, β, λ2|Data)∝αn1+a41(1−α)b41βn+a31λn2+a2−1

×e(b3c1λ2(αD1(β)+D2(β)+b2),

n =n1+n2, c1 =

n

X

j=1

lntj:n,

D1(β) =

n1

X

j=1

tj:nβ + (n−n11β,

D2(β) =

n

X

j=n1+1

(tjβ:n−τ1β) + (n−n)(τ2β −τ1β).

l2(α, β, λ2|Data) is integrable if proper priors are assumed on all the unknown parameters.

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Bayes Estimate and Credible Interval

Squared error loss function.

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Squared error loss function.

gB(β, λ1, λ2) =

Z Z Z

g(β, λ1, 2)l1(β, λ1, λ2)dλ21dα.

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Bayes Estimate and Credible Interval

Squared error loss function.

gB(β, λ1, λ2) =

Z Z Z

g(β, λ1, 2)l1(β, λ1, λ2)dλ21dα.

Bayes estimate of g(β, λ1, λ2) cannot be obtained explicitly in general.

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Squared error loss function.

gB(β, λ1, λ2) =

Z Z Z

g(β, λ1, 2)l1(β, λ1, λ2)dλ21dα.

Bayes estimate of g(β, λ1, λ2) cannot be obtained explicitly in general.

An algorithm based on importance sampling is proposed to computegbB(β, λ1, λ2) and to construct CRI for g(β, λ1, λ2) in both the cases.

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Bayes Estimate and Credible Interval

l1(β, λ1, λ2| Data) = l31, |β, Data)×l42, |β,Data)

×l5(β|Data), where

l31,|β, Data) = {A1(β)}n1+a1

Γ(n1+a1) λn11+a1−1e−λ1A1(β) if λ1 >0, l42,|β, Data) = {A2(β)}n2+a2

Γ(n2+a2) λn22+a21eλ2A2(β) if λ2 >0, l5(β|Data) =c2 βn+a31e(b3c1

{A1(β)}n1+a1{A2(β)}n2+a2 if β >0.

(77)
(78)

Illustrative Example

An artificial data is generated from KHM withn = 40, β= 2, λ1 = 1/1.2⋍0.833, λ2 = 1/4.5⋍2.222, and τ1 = 0.6.

(79)

An artificial data is generated from KHM withn = 40, β= 2, λ1 = 1/1.2⋍0.833, λ2 = 1/4.5⋍2.222, and τ1 = 0.6.

τ2 = 0.8.

(80)

Illustrative Example

An artificial data is generated from KHM withn = 40, β= 2, λ1 = 1/1.2⋍0.833, λ2 = 1/4.5⋍2.222, and τ1 = 0.6.

τ2 = 0.8.

a1 =b1 =a2 =b2 =a3 =b3 = 0.0001 and a4 =b4 = 1.

(81)

An artificial data is generated from KHM withn = 40, β= 2, λ1 = 1/1.2⋍0.833, λ2 = 1/4.5⋍2.222, and τ1 = 0.6.

τ2 = 0.8.

a1 =b1 =a2 =b2 =a3 =b3 = 0.0001 and a4 =b4 = 1.

Prior I : βb= 2.35, λb1 = 0.93, λb2 = 2.61.

Prior II: βb= 2.49, bλ1 = 1.01, bλ2 = 2.50.

(82)

Illustrative Example

An artificial data is generated from KHM withn = 40, β= 2, λ1 = 1/1.2⋍0.833, λ2 = 1/4.5⋍2.222, and τ1 = 0.6.

τ2 = 0.8.

a1 =b1 =a2 =b2 =a3 =b3 = 0.0001 and a4 =b4 = 1.

Prior I : βb= 2.35, λb1 = 0.93, λb2 = 2.61.

Prior II: βb= 2.49, bλ1 = 1.01, bλ2 = 2.50.

Prior I : 95% symmetric CRI for β is (1.12, 4.04).

Prior II: 95% symmetric CRI for β is (0.45, 2.44).

(83)
(84)

Conclusions

Extensive simulation has been done to judge the performance of the proposed procedures.

a1 =b1 =a2 =b2 =a3 =b3 = 0.0001 and a4 =b4 = 1.

(85)

Extensive simulation has been done to judge the performance of the proposed procedures.

a1 =b1 =a2 =b2 =a3 =b3 = 0.0001 and a4 =b4 = 1.

MSEs of all unknown parameters decrease as n increases keeping other quantities fixed.

(86)

Conclusions

Extensive simulation has been done to judge the performance of the proposed procedures.

a1 =b1 =a2 =b2 =a3 =b3 = 0.0001 and a4 =b4 = 1.

MSEs of all unknown parameters decrease as n increases keeping other quantities fixed.

MSEs of BE of all unknown parameters are smaller in case of Prior II than those in case of Prior I.

(87)

Extensive simulation has been done to judge the performance of the proposed procedures.

a1 =b1 =a2 =b2 =a3 =b3 = 0.0001 and a4 =b4 = 1.

MSEs of all unknown parameters decrease as n increases keeping other quantities fixed.

MSEs of BE of all unknown parameters are smaller in case of Prior II than those in case of Prior I.

Other loss functions and other censoring schemes can be handled in a very similar fashion.

(88)
(89)

Step-stress model in the presence of competing risks under Bayesian framework.

(90)

Future Works

Step-stress model in the presence of competing risks under Bayesian framework.

Optimality of SSLT under Bayesian framework.

(91)

Step-stress model in the presence of competing risks under Bayesian framework.

Optimality of SSLT under Bayesian framework.

Prior elicitation is becoming a popular topic among Bayesian. It will be a challenging task to find a subjective prior for step-stress life testing models.

(92)

Thank You

References

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